Home News The award-winning Feminist Frequency is shutting down after 14 years

The award-winning Feminist Frequency is shutting down after 14 years

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feminist advocacy

After 14 years of operation, Feminist Frequency, the award-winning nonprofit founded in 2009 by Executive Director Anita Sarkeesian, has announced its closure. The organization initially started as a platform for critiquing media, especially video games and pop culture, and later expanded to include podcasts, gaming resources, and an Online Harassment Hotline. While industry resources will remain available on the website, the hotline will cease operations by the end of September, and the rest of Feminist Frequency will gradually wind down by the end of 2023.

In a press release, Anita Sarkeesian expressed her gratitude towards the team and partners, stating that the organization had achieved more than she could have ever imagined. However, she acknowledged that the toll of exhaustion and burnout, common in the nonprofit sector, had become significant.

Feminist Frequency garnered attention and support when it raised funding through a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2012, allowing the creation of a video series that addressed misogynistic trends in the gaming industry. However, this also attracted severe backlash, particularly from the dark corners of society, leading to the notorious Gamergate harassment campaign. Sarkeesian became a target of online and offline abuse, facing threats that included a bomb threat and the cancellation of a speech at a university due to security concerns.

Despite the challenging circumstances, Feminist Frequency continued its work to raise awareness of injustices and offer valuable resources. The organization partnered with Intel in 2015 to promote opportunities for women and minorities, and in recognition of their efforts, they received a Peabody Award for Digital and Interactive Storytelling.

Anita Sarkeesian acknowledged that progress had been made within the gaming industry, fostering essential conversations among players and creators that were previously absent. However, she believes it is now time to close this chapter and take a well-deserved rest before embarking on the next phase of her professional life. The organization’s achievements will be celebrated in a private event during the upcoming Game Developers Conference.

While Feminist Frequency may be closing its doors, its impact on media criticism and the gaming industry will continue to be remembered and serve as a catalyst for change.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about feminist advocacy

Q: What is Feminist Frequency?

A: Feminist Frequency is an award-winning nonprofit organization founded in 2009 by Anita Sarkeesian. It started as a platform for media criticism of video games and pop culture and later expanded to include podcasts, gaming resources, and an Online Harassment Hotline.

Q: Why is Feminist Frequency shutting down?

A: After 14 years of operation, Feminist Frequency is closing due to exhaustion and burnout, common in the nonprofit world. The organization’s hotline will cease operations by the end of September, and the rest of Feminist Frequency will gradually wind down by the end of 2023.

Q: What impact did Feminist Frequency have in the gaming industry?

A: Feminist Frequency had a significant impact in raising awareness about injustices in the gaming industry. It addressed misogynistic storytelling trends and objectification of female characters, leading to important conversations among players and creators.

Q: What was the Gamergate harassment campaign?

A: The Gamergate harassment campaign was a backlash against Feminist Frequency and Anita Sarkeesian’s work. It attracted severe abuse from dark corners of society, including threats and online harassment targeting Sarkeesian.

Q: What will happen to the organization’s resources?

A: Although Feminist Frequency is closing, its industry resources will remain available on its website indefinitely. The Online Harassment Hotline, however, will be closing at the end of September.

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